Clot dissolving: plasmin dissolves fibrin and anticoagulants

2021-02-08 12:00 AM

When a blood clot is formed, a large amount of plasminogen is confined to the clot with other plasma proteins. If they are not activated, plasmin will not form and the clot will dissolve.

Having an euglobulin type plasma protein plasminogen (or profibrinolytic) when activated is called plasmin (or fibrinolysin). Plasmin is a proteolytic enzyme similar to the digestive system trypsin that breaks down important proteins from the pancreas. Plasmin destroys fibrin fibres and some other protein-based anticoagulants such as fibrinogen, factor V, factor VIII, prothrombin and factor XII. Thus, once plasmin is formed, it can dissolve the blood clot by destroying many clotting factors, thus sometimes even reducing the coagulation of the blood.

Plasminogen activates to create plasmin, then dissolve the clot. When a blood clot is formed, a large amount of plasminogen is confined to the clot with other plasma proteins. If they are not activated, plasmin will not form and the clot will dissolve. Damaged tissue and vascular endothelium slowly release a very powerful activator, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA).

A few days later, after the bleeding has stopped, the tPA converts plasminogen to plasmin to remove the remaining unnecessary clots. In fact, with many small blood vessels, if the blood flow is blocked by a blood clot, it is re-opened by this mechanism.

Thus, a particularly important function of the plasmin system is to remove small blood clots from the millions of tiny peripheral blood vessels that could become clogged if not cleared.

MOST VIEW

Pathophysiology of cardiogenic shock

Urine formation: Reabsorbed glomerular filtration

Air in and out of the lungs: pressure causes the movement of air

Mechanism of urine concentration: osmotic pressure changes in different segments of the renal tubule

Absorption and excretion of potassium through the kidneys

Prothrombin activation: initiates blood clotting

Pulmonary capillary dynamics: capillary fluid exchange and pulmonary interstitial fluid dynamics

Graphical analysis of high-volume heart failure

Estimated renal plasma flow: PAH clearance

Reduced sodium chloride, dilates arterioles, increases Renin release.

Calculate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR): the forces that cause the filtration process

Nephron: The functional unit of the kidney

Concentrated urine formation: urea contributes to increased osmotic pressure in the renal medullary

Red blood cells: differentiation and synthesis

Ammonia buffering system: excretes excess H + and creates new HCO3

Extracellular fluid distribution between interstitial space and blood vessels

The proximal tubule reabsorption: active and passive reabsorption

The endocrine regulates tubular reabsorption

Origin of lymphocytes: the body's resistance to infection

Physiological anatomy of the kidneys and urinary system

The kidneys excrete sodium and fluid: feedback regulates body fluids and arterial pressure

Iron metabolism: haemoglobin synthesis

Sodium channel blockers: decrease the reabsorption of sodium in the manifold

Self-regulation of glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow

Leukocyte formation: the process of formation in the bone marrow