Leukaemia: an increase in the number of abnormal white blood cells

2021-05-08 12:34 AM

Two common types of Leukaemia: Lymphoid leukaemia is caused by an overproduction of lymphocytes, which usually begins in one lymph node or another lymphoid tissue and then spreads to other areas of the body.

The unrestricted production of leukocytes can be caused by overproduction mutations of a myeloid cell or a lymphoid cell. That process causes leukaemia, which is often characterized by a sharp increase in the number of abnormal white blood cells in the circulating blood.

Two common types of Leukaemia: Lymphoid leukaemia is caused by an overproduction of lymphocytes, which usually begins in one lymph node or another lymphoid tissue and then spreads to other areas of the body. The second type is myeloid leukaemia, which begins with an overproduction of the young bone marrow in the bone marrow that spreads throughout the body to the point that leukocytes are produced in abundance outside the marrow, especially tissues in the lymph nodes, spleen and liver. 

In myeloid leukaemia, the cancer process can produce partially differentiated cells, which may be called agranulocytic leukaemia, eosinophil leukaemia, eosinophilic leukaemia, or lymphadenopathy. mono bridge. Usually, however, leukaemia cells are malformed and do not differentiate and resemble normal white blood cells. Normally, the more cells that do not differentiate, the more acute the leukaemia, often leading to death within months if left untreated. With many differentiated cells, the process can become chronic, often losing its function to provide protection against infection.

 

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