Leukopenia: reduces the body's protection against many bacteria

2021-05-08 12:32 AM

For 2 days after the bone marrow stops producing white blood cells, ulcers may develop in the mouth and large intestine or in some people severe respiratory infections may develop. Bacteria from the sores quickly penetrate the tissue and blood.

A clinical situation called leukopenia, in which the bone marrow produces very few white blood cells occurs occasionally. This situation reduces the body's protection against many bacteria and other agents that enter the tissue.

Normally, the human body lives in symbiosis with many bacteria because all the body's mucous membranes are always exposed to a large number of bacteria. The mouth is almost always filled with spirochetes, pneumococci, and streptococci, and similar bacteria are present on a smaller scale throughout the entire digestive tract. At the far end of the gastrointestinal tract, especially there are many intestinal bacteria. Furthermore, bacteria can always be found on the surfaces of the eyes, urethra, vagina. An immediate decrease in the number of white blood cells allows bacteria to enter the tissue because bacteria are always present.

For 2 days after the bone marrow stops producing white blood cells, ulcers may develop in the mouth and large intestine or in some people severe respiratory infections may develop. Bacteria from the sores quickly penetrate the tissue and blood. Without treatment, death usually occurs in less than a week after the onset of acute leukopenia.

Gamma X-rays or exposure to drugs and chemicals containing benzene or nucleic anthracene may impair bone marrow activity. Indeed, many common drugs such as chloramphenicol (an antibiotic), thiouracil (for thyrotoxicosis), and even suppositories can also experience (rarely) leukopenia, thus establishing the entire spiral. infectiousness of this disease.

After a slight injury to the bone marrow by the irradiation, some stem cells such as myeloblast and hemocytoblast may not be destroyed in the marrow and are capable of regenerating the bone marrow, providing sufficient duration of potency. Patients who are properly treated with blood transfusions, adding antibiotics and other drugs to prevent infections often develop enough new bone marrow over weeks to months for blood cell levels to return to normal.

 

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