Extra thoracic compression: ventricular defibrillation

2021-06-01 03:14 PM

One technique of chest compressions without opening the chest is rhythmic compression on the chest wall with artificial ventilation. This process followed by electrical defibrillation is called cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Unless defibrillation is performed within a minute of initiation of fibrillation, the heart is usually too tired to recover from defibrillation because of reduced coronary nutrition. However, it is still possible to recover with compression and defibrillation later. In this way, a small amount of blood is delivered to the coronary vessels, the heart muscle is nourished. After a few minutes of chest compressions, electrical defibrillation is usually more effective. Indeed, ventricular fibrillation with compression for about 90 minutes still successfully depolarizes.

One technique of chest compressions without opening the chest is rhythmic compression on the chest wall with artificial ventilation. This process, followed by electrical defibrillation, is called cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Lack of blood to the brain for longer than 5-8 minutes causes brain tissue damage. Although the heart recovers, the patient can still die from nerve damage.