Inspiratory volume measurement: record changes in lung volume measurement

2021-05-17 03:30 PM

Changes of lung volume under different breathing conditions. To describe the event of pulmonary ventilation, the air in the lungs can be divided into 4 volumes and 4 volumes medium for young adults.

Pulmonary ventilation can be assessed by recording the volume of air moving in and out of the lungs, a procedure called lung capacity testing. The lung capacity measuring device is shown in figure 38-5. It consists of a drum that rotates around a water chamber, which is balanced by a dumbbell. In the drum is when breathing, usually air or oxygen; 1 pcs tube connecting the mouth to an air bubble. When one breathes in and out of the chamber, drum up and down, and record on paper.

Figure. Spirometer

 

Figure. Diagram of the passage of air through the airways during normal breathing and during maximal inhalation and exhalation.

The figure shows a breathing movement recorder showing changes in lung volume under different breathing conditions. To describe the event of pulmonary ventilation, the air in the lungs can be divided into 4 volumes and 4 volumes medium for young adults.

Board. Mean lung capacity and volume in healthy young men.

Lung volume

Looking at the left side of the figure is a list of 4 lung volumes. Each volume has the following characteristics:

(1) Tidal volume: is the volume inhaled and exhaled during each normal breath, about 500ml average adult male.

(2) Inspiratory reserve volume is the maximum inspiratory volume that exceeds the normal inspiratory volume at full inspiration, usually about 3000ml.

(3) Expiratory reserve volume: is the maximum expiratory volume using expiratory force after the end of tidal exhalation, usually about 1200ml.

(4) Residual volume is the volume of air maintained in the lungs after the maximum expiratory force, about 1200ml on average.

Lung capacity

Looking to the right of the figure is a list of important lung capacities:

(1) Inspiratory capacity: equal to the tidal volume plus inspiratory reserve volume. On average, about 3500ml per person can breathe in, starting from normal exhalation to maximum lung expansion.

(2) Functional residual capacity (FRC): equals expiratory reserve volume plus residual air volume. This capacity is the amount of air that remains in the lungs after the end of normal expiration (approximately 2300ml).

(3) Vital capacity (VC): equals inspiratory reserve volume plus tidal volume plus residual volume. This capacity is the maximum amount of air each person can expel from the lungs after the lungs are first filled to maximum and then exhaled to the maximum (approximately 4600ml).

(4) Total lung capacity (TLC): is the maximum volume that the lungs can expand to the maximum possible (about 5800ml); is the sum of the vital and residual volumes.

All lung volumes and capacities are generally 20-25% less in women than in men, and they are larger in athletes.