Eye disease associated with immune allergies

2021-02-02 12:00 AM

The eyes are closely related to the other organs of the body. Many systemic diseases with eye manifestations and many eye conditions may be signs of systemic illness.

The eyes are closely related to the other organs of the body. Many systemic diseases with eye manifestations and many eye conditions may be signs of systemic illness.

For many patients, eye exam not only allows the detection of eye lesions caused by systemic disease but also helps to confirm diagnosis, prognosis or evaluate the results of systemic treatment.

Many allergic-systemic diseases can cause damage to the eyes, mainly in the anterior part of the eyeball: spring conjunctivitis, giant papillitis in contact lenses, adrenalitis corneal, scleritis, Mooren corneal ulcer, tuberculosis keratitis, syphilis, herpes, shingles, etc.

Two systemic allergies that commonly cause damage to the eyes are:

Stevens-Johnson syndrome (erythema multiforme)

This is a common serious skin-mucosal disease in children due to a hypersensitivity reaction to drugs (especially sulfamides, aspirin, anti-inflammatory drugs), some cases due to food. Systemic manifestations include fever, erythema multiforme and mucosal (oral, genital, conjunctival) rash. Conjunctivitis damage can lead to eyelid adhesions, dry eyes due to occlusion of the tear duct. Severe cases lead to corneal ulceration, corneal perforation, intraocular inflammation.

Lyell's syndrome (necrotic exfoliation)

Lyell's syndrome is also a serious illness due to a hypersensitivity reaction to certain drugs or infection. Typical general signs are blisters on the skin that look like a burn, which, when sore, exposes the red tissue underneath. Conjunctivitis is similar to Stevens-Johnson syndrome but is less severe. Often accompanied by disturbances of electrolyte water and a severe prognosis.