Contraception for women about to menopause

2021-03-25 12:00 AM

After stopping the drug, if it is certain that menstruation has ended, the use of contraception only needs to continue for another year.

Although fertility decreases as a woman gets older, pregnancy is possible even at the age of near menopause. Therefore, the application of contraceptive methods is still necessary until the natural period is gone for a year.

However, the timing of menopause is not the same for everyone. There are women who go through premature menopause, others go into menopause later, usually fluctuate greatly between 45 and 55 years old. Meanwhile, the use of combined oral contraceptives containing oestrogen and progestogen or progestogen pills alone are effective in creating "bleeding recovery" phenomenon similar to menstrual blood. This makes it difficult to determine menopause in women, as it is not possible to know whether spontaneous menstruation has ended. Therefore, at the time of suspicion of menopause, it is necessary to stop taking the oral contraceptive pills, switch to another type of contraception, such as the vaginal diaphragm.

After stopping the drug, if it is certain that menstruation has ended, the use of contraception only needs to continue for another year.

In the event that menstruation continues, contraception should be maintained as before.

In both cases, it is still advisable to begin using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and combined vaginal diaphragm contraception at this age.

Another test that may be used is to check serum FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone). If the result is high (about> 20U / liter), you should stop taking oral contraceptives, switch to using contraceptive method with vaginal diaphragm. One month later, repeat FSH serology test. If the results are still high, there may not be any need for contraception.