Practice diagnosis and treatment of chest pain

2021-02-05 12:00 AM

If the patient has a history of myocardial infarction, split aneurysm, pulmonary embolism, or is otherwise very weak, seek medical attention immediately.

Chest pain is a general symptom that can simply be caused by pain in the muscles and bones, but it can also be a manifestation of ischemia in the heart that can lead to death. Both of these cases are equally common, so chest pain cannot be underestimated.

Causes

Muscle and bone pain.

Rib cartilage pain.

Esophagitis.

Heartburn.

Angina.

Acute myocardial infarction.

Coronary artery disease.

Ischemic heart disease.

Pulmonary embolism.

Chest infection.

Bronchitis.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis is mainly based on accompanying symptoms and medical history to determine the exact cause of chest pain.

Diagnose and exclude emergency cases such as myocardial infarction, dissecting aneurysm, pulmonary embolism ...

If the patient has a history of myocardial infarction, split aneurysm, pulmonary embolism, or is otherwise very weak, seek medical attention immediately.

Identify pain location and nature of pain. Pain in the chest, feeling of pressure, and spreading to the arm or neck suggest a heart attack. Mid-chest pain, a burning sensation that spreads to your back, suggests a split aneurysm. Pulmonary embolism causes throbbing pain and short, rapid breathing.

The symptoms observed from the outside such as depression, pallor, shortness of breath, sweating ... are all signs of serious illness.

A heart attack or split aneurysm is more likely when the following risk factors are associated with:

Men over 50 years old.

Tobacco addiction.

A history of coronary artery disease, diabetes, hypertension or hyperlipidaemia.

Someone in a family has a heart attack or split aneurysm.

Pulmonary embolism is more likely when the following risk factors are associated:

Recently suffered from deep vascular thrombosis.

After surgery.

Injured.

Are taking combined oral contraceptive pills.

Tobacco addiction.

History of thrombosis.

Chest examination: chest pressure test to determine exclusion of musculoskeletal pain.

Hear to determine if there is a brushing sound of pericarditis, although this is a very rare case.

If the patient is very sensitive in the epigastric region, gastritis or oesophageal reflux should be thought of.

Do a general exam, check pulse, blood pressure, and body temperature to find more signs to help make the differential diagnosis.

An electrocardiogram (ECG) can help identify cases of myocardial infarction or ischemia. However, in some cases, results may still be normal in patients with these conditions.

Chest x-rays are usually not of high diagnostic value, but can help identify cases of chest infections or fractured ribs.

Treatment

Treatment of a chest pain depends entirely on the diagnosis of the cause of the chest pain. When there is no exact conclusion about the cause, all measures are only meaningful for exploration. The following sections will explain more about the treatment after the cause has been identified.