Practice diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma

2021-02-05 12:00 AM

This sudden and rapid glaucoma is called acute glaucoma because a narrow-angle at the edge of the cornea completely blocks fluid flow. Therefore, the disease is also known as closed-angle glaucoma.

Glaucoma, also known as glaucoma, is a very uncommon disease, especially acute glaucoma, which is very rare. However, the complications and harms of the disease can be very serious, so it is necessary to detect it early and treat it well to avoid affecting eyesight.

Reason

Normally, the fluid in our eyes has moderate pressure to keep the centre of the eye round. When fluid pressure in the eye increases above normal, it is called glaucoma. Glaucoma causes pressure on the tiny blood vessels that feed the optic nerve and damage nerve fibers. It causes vision loss, and in severe cases can lead to complete blindness.

Slow, growing glaucoma that persists for days is called chronic glaucoma, or open-angle glaucoma. The cause of this is a gradual blockage of fluid in the anterior chamber. The disease progresses slowly over many years, fluid pressure in the eye increases slowly, gradually, until enough to affect the eye. The disease is inherited, so it often occurs in people in the same family. The disease develops with age, usually starts around 40 years old and increases with age. If the pressure increases very little, no treatment is needed because there are no significant symptoms. If the increase is large, then vision loss will manifest and therefore requires treatment. The number of people with chronic glaucoma that require treatment at the age of 40 is only about 0.05%, while the proportion in the 80's is 7%.

This sudden and rapid glaucoma is called acute glaucoma because a narrow angle at the edge of the cornea completely blocks fluid flow. Therefore, the disease is also known as closed-angle glaucoma.

Diagnose

Acute glaucoma is very rare, causing a lot of pain in the eyes. There are symptoms of nausea or vomiting, headache suddenly and may be severe pain in the area of ​​the eye or right in the eye. Blurred eyes and visible halos before eyes. Severe cases can lead to sudden visual impairment, meaning a complete loss of vision. The pupil is slightly dilated and is usually oval-shaped instead of round. Eyes are wet and patients are especially afraid of light. Common in people over 50 years old.

Chronic glaucoma has no symptoms, because glaucoma rises slowly and does not change vision immediately, so patients often do not know early, only

found when vision was greatly reduced. For early detection, routine eye exams and eye pressure measurements are needed. Pay special attention when a person has found glaucoma in the family.

Treatment

Acute glaucoma is an emergency case with simultaneous measures such as drops, oral drugs ... to quickly lower the eye pressure. In addition, once the eye pressure is under control, surgery is also needed to prevent further glaucoma attacks.

Chronic glaucoma can be treated with Timoptol (Timoptic) eye drops to lower the eye pressure. Use a type with a concentration of 0.25 - 0.50%, drops into the eye 2 times a day, 1 drop each time. During the use of the drug must periodically check the eye pressure to make sure it is effective. If the eye drops are ineffective, a long-acting oral tablet should be used. In this case, the patient usually takes lifelong medication to keep the eye pressure from rising. If tablets are also ineffective, and when examining still sees a gradual increase in eye pressure and decreased vision, surgery may be recommended to normalize the flow of fluid in the eye.