Practice the diagnosis and treatment of painful intercourse

2021-03-25 12:00 AM

Painful intercourse can be caused by a woman with vaginal dryness, a lack of sebum that makes it difficult and painful to have sex, most commonly after menopause.

Painful intercourse can be seen in both sexes. In women, the pain can be in the outer or deep pelvic area.

Reason

External pain is usually caused by diseases of the genitals such as gonorrhoea, genital warts, chlamydia ... It can hurt in the pubic bone or around the vulva.

Some spermicides used in combination with contraception can cause burning pain in both people.

Men who experience pain during intercourse can be caused by an abnormality in the genitals, such as a bent penis while erect, and a narrowed foreskin.

Prostatitis causes a stabbing pain in the foreskin, which can also cause pain throughout the pelvic area or cause a burning sensation.

Cystitis, urinary tract infections are also causing pain, more common in women.

Painful intercourse can be caused by a woman with vaginal dryness, a lack of sebum that makes it difficult and painful to have sex, most commonly after menopause.

Psychological problems can also cause pain during sex, such as improperly spasm of the vaginal muscles, making it difficult for the penis to insert and causing pain.

Painful intercourse can also be caused by the woman not being aroused enough to arouse sexual desire.

Women suffer from pain in the deep areas can

Pelvic diseases, such as uterine tumours, ectopic pregnancy, ovarian cysts ...

Endometriosis thickens the uterine lining.

Chronic ovarian inflammation.

Pelvic varicose veins.

Diseases of the cervix, such as a tumour or infection.

Diagnose

Use your accompanying symptoms and physical examination to find the cause of the pain.

Perform necessary tests to make the definitive diagnosis of related diseases.

Pay attention to psychological factors that can be the underlying cause of unusual sexual reactions, such as spasms of the vaginal muscles.

Treatment

Provide psychological support to the patient, relieve unreasonable stress or anxiety.

Pain caused by the woman is not aroused enough can be identified by directing more clitoral stimulation before each sexual session. If the results are good, she should discuss it with her partner to do it.

Treat the known cause of the pain, if any.

Vaginal dryness can be treated directly with oestrogen vaginal cream, along with hormone replacement therapy if menopause has passed. Vaginal lubricants can be used to relieve pain during sex.

Use pain relievers at the right level.

Limit or stop having sex completely if you are being treated for a sexually transmitted infection. Conduct treatment for both people at the same time and have sex only after effective treatment ends.