Preventive mental health problems

2021-07-14 03:54 PM

Ignoring the technical side of the word, this means that health promotion doesn't just work with individuals

Boost your health

According to the World Health Organization (1996), health promotion includes a variety of complex interventions of varying degrees that not only aim to prevent disease but also promote and promote health. positive. This view includes:

There is a right approach to health.

Respect different cultures and beliefs.

Promote positive health as well as prevent disease.

Work at the system level, not just the individual.

Use join methods.

Ignoring the technical side of the word, this means that health promotion is not just about individuals but needs to be done at the societal level to encourage health improvements. Work with communities to meet specific health needs and strive to improve health and quality of life, not just prevent disease. Health promotion programs can be implemented at the legal level, with the community, with groups and individuals within the community. It can be run by many people, some of whom specialize in health promotion and many others not. Some examples of the extent to which health promotion works to minimize problems caused by alcoholism are given.

The link between poor mental health and socioeconomic inequality has led some commentators to argue that the most convincing intervention strategies are those aimed at reducing inequality. Health must be implemented on all three levels: social, economic and political. From an economic perspective, strategies should include measures to keep unemployment as low as possible. The Swedish economic model that has been proven to work includes: maintaining a high level of employment, exchange of jobs, high-quality training in skills that the labor market offers, encouraging encourage employers to hire people and as a last resort the right to temporary public employment. Davey Smith et al. (1999) pointed out a range of different economic measures. They argue that setting a basic income 'affordable' is one way to end poverty. In addition, they suggest that all subsidies be increased for families with young children who are receiving income support to avoid putting their children at a disadvantage from birth. . They also note that a quarter of children are born to mothers under the age of 25 and that the government needs to ensure that those under that age receive the same benefits as those who are older. This is well beyond the current capacity to assess the strengths and weaknesses of different economic systems. However, these have implications for mental health and therefore a regulatory framework is needed for those involved in the public health and wellness promotion sector. In addition, they suggest that all subsidies be increased for families with young children who are receiving income support to avoid putting their children at a disadvantage from birth. . They also note that a quarter of children are born to mothers under the age of 25 and that the government needs to ensure that those under that age receive the same benefits as those who are older. This is well beyond the current capacity to assess the strengths and weaknesses of different economic systems. However, these have implications for mental health and therefore a regulatory framework is needed for those involved in the public health and wellness promotion sector. In addition, they suggest that all subsidies be increased for families with young children who are receiving income support to avoid putting their children at a disadvantage from birth. . They also note that a quarter of children are born to mothers under the age of 25 and that the government needs to ensure that those under that age receive the same benefits as those who are older. This is well beyond the current capacity to assess the strengths and weaknesses of different economic systems. However, these have implications for mental health and therefore a regulatory framework is needed for those involved in the public health and wellness promotion sector. They suggested that all subsidies be increased for families with young children receiving income support to avoid putting their children at a disadvantage from birth. They also note that a quarter of children are born to mothers under the age of 25 and that the government needs to ensure that those under that age receive the same benefits as those who are older. This is well beyond the current capacity to assess the strengths and weaknesses of different economic systems. However, these have implications for mental health and therefore a regulatory framework is needed for those involved in the public health and wellness promotion sector. They suggested that all subsidies be increased for families with young children receiving income support to avoid putting their children at a disadvantage from birth. They also note that a quarter of children are born to mothers under the age of 25 and that the government needs to ensure that those under that age receive the same benefits as those who are older. This is just beyond the current capacity to assess the strengths and weaknesses of different economic systems. However, these have implications for mental health and therefore a regulatory framework is needed for those involved in the public health and wellness promotion sector. They also note that a quarter of children are born to mothers under the age of 25 and that the government needs to ensure that those under that age receive the same benefits as those who are older. This is well beyond the current capacity to assess the strengths and weaknesses of different economic systems. However, these have implications for mental health and therefore a regulatory framework is needed for those involved in the public health and wellness promotion sector. They also note that a quarter of children are born to mothers under the age of 25 and that the government needs to ensure that those under that age receive the same benefits as those who are older. This is just beyond the current capacity to assess the strengths and weaknesses of different economic systems. However, these have implications for mental health and therefore a regulatory framework is needed for those involved in the public health and wellness promotion sector.

Therapeutic interventions

Most health improvement interventions use only narrow rather than basic approaches. Interventions are still primarily therapeutic, although conducted outside of traditional outpatient departments or in new populations. Innovative development is working with people at risk of mental health problems, early detection and treatment of such problems, preventive counseling and therapeutic services in the community, in polyclinics or work environments. Other interventions are aimed at preventing relapse in people who have been identified as having a mental health problem and who are treated in health care services (Secer, 1998). In other words, prevention tries to focus on social health services, health care services, to the individual and to end the chain of interventions.

Use the media

An important exception to the individualized approach are programs in the media that are used to educate and influence people with or vulnerable to mental health problems. . One in four people will experience mental health problems in their lifetime, few of whom receive professional help (Jerkins et al. 1998). Diverse communication systems can provide a means to reach such individuals. Barker et al. (1993) provided a good example of this approach. They documented the impact of a series of seven 10-minute programs on various mental health topics. An audience poll showed that watching the series resulted in changes in attitudes, not behaviors: possibly, as expected, that is due to the brevity of each topic. Bennett et al. (1991) confirmed the effectiveness of a larger television series "A Guide to Beneficial Alcohol Use", aimed at drinking. The program is designed to appeal to young drinkers. Media personalities as well as experts have analyzed the meaning of reasonable drinking for viewers and provided reasonable drinking patterns. Rowan Atkinson, for example, provides humorous reminders of the limits of reasonable drinking each week. One of the presenters even reduced his consumption after the course. Surveys before and after the course showed a general understanding of the whole population about reasonable drinking. This led to a slight shift in people's attitudes from drinking more to drinking less. (1991) confirmed the effectiveness of a larger television series "A Guide to Beneficial Alcohol Use", aimed at drinking. The program is designed to appeal to young drinkers. Media personalities as well as experts have analyzed the meaning of reasonable drinking for viewers and provided reasonable drinking patterns. Rowan Atkinson, for example, provides humorous reminders of the limits of reasonable drinking each week. One of the presenters even reduced his intake after the course. Surveys before and after the course showed a general understanding of the whole population about reasonable drinking. This led to a slight shift in people's attitudes from drinking more to drinking less. (1991) confirmed the effectiveness of a larger television series "A Guide to Beneficial Alcohol Use", aimed at drinking. The program is designed to appeal to young drinkers. Media personalities as well as experts have analyzed the meaning of reasonable drinking for viewers and provided reasonable drinking patterns. For example, Rowan Atkinson provides humorous reminders of the limits of reasonable drinking each week. One of the presenters even reduced his consumption after the course. Surveys before and after the course showed the general understanding of the whole population about reasonable drinking. This led to a slight shift in people's attitudes from drinking more to drinking less.

Public Education

Another health-promoting approach is to provide a relatively simple form of psychological intervention that is open to everyone: often in the form of stress management classes. Brown et al. (2000) evaluated such a program. They run a series of eight free one- or half-day stress management seminars in a leisure center, according to a promotional campaign as part of the “Birmingham Well 2000” program. Such classes teach participants relaxation skills and other skills for managing stress. Their comparison groups included participants in an all-day program focused on healthy eating, alcohol awareness, and physical exercise, and a group of people on waiting lists for programs. future conference. The program is universal and appeals to both people who have seen a health professional, often their GP, about stress-related issues and who have never seen one. The intervention also proved to be successful. Compared to baseline levels, participants in the full-day workshop experienced significantly greater reductions in stress and anxiety than the control group three months after attending the workshop. An impressive result, the intervention is relatively compact, and many people can participate.

Labor organizations can also provide a system to help people learn stress management skills. One survey (Fielding and Piserchia, 1989) found that about a quarter of large US companies holding such classes have been shown to be effective, although Oldenburg and Harris (1996) note that they only attract about 10% to 40% of the workforce and that many people only attend a few sessions to achieve a purpose. Also, a lot of people with anxiety didn't attend.

Building and conducting these types of workshops, while beneficial to attendees, is relatively expensive and time-consuming, so some groups have begun to explore other, more technically effective approaches. cost. One interesting approach is to offer stress management training and psychotherapy online. Just by doing a quick internet search, you can find thousands of independent therapists offering this service. Those services are intended to be therapeutic rather than preventive. However, a backup project of a larger scope is also under construction. As this book was being written, an interactive online stress management program was being developed by Unilever. Those interested can participate in the program through health counseling offices or online throughout Europe. The program includes exercise and dietary advice to reduce stress, Limit behaviors that increase your risk of heart disease. Matano et al. (2000) reported on a more purposeful approach. They have created a website that provides guidance on how to reduce alcohol consumption for a large network. As with the Unilever project, usefulness and effectiveness have yet to be assessed, but the potential of this intervention is impressive.

Organizational intervention

To date, preventive approaches have focused on helping people more effectively deal with stress in their lives. at higher levels of intervention may reduce stressors. While it is still difficult to make large-scale social changes to improve mental health, constrained by economic and political factors, one place that can do better is the workplace. .

The work of Maes et al. (1998) considered one of the few network stress management projects in the workplace that used a systems approach to reduce stress. These interventions focus on changing/repairing important/key aspects of the work environment in order to promote mental health across the workforce of a major industrial manufacturer. Their intervention has led to studies aimed at identifying working conditions that can both improve worker health and improve production efficiency. Individuals work to the best of their ability, avoid work or change jobs for short periods of time, have an examination of the labor organization, and have appropriate socialization in the working situation. With those ideas in mind, within the framework of production, they try to change the nature of each worker's work to bring it closer to the idea. In addition, they train managers in leadership and communication skills, and methods to recognize, prevent, and reduce personal stress at work. Although there was no stress measurement in the study program, the changes did increase the quality of work, reduce the rate of turnover. Both are indicators that workers are in good health at work