Diastolic murmur: tricuspid stenosis murmur

2021-03-15 12:00 AM

As with other valve damage in rheumatic heart disease, the thickening of the valve leaflets, the stiffening of the valve edges and the stiffening of the tendons prevent the valve from opening thereby disrupting blood flow through the valve opening. 

Description

Mild diastolic, fillet-shaped sound is clearly heard in the anterior cardiac tricuspid region (about the left quadrant of the sternum).

It is often confused with mitral stenosis, and can also be seen in tricuspid stenosis.

Figure. Time and shape of tricuspid stenosis

Causes

Frequent

Rheumatic heart disease - most common.

Less common

Congenital tricuspid stenosis and other congenital abnormalities.

Carcinoid syndrome.

Tumour - rare.

Mechanism

The murmur is caused by turbulent blood flow through a narrowed, damaged, or abnormal valve opening.

As with other valve damage in rheumatic heart disease, the thickening of the valve leaflets, the stiffening of the valve edges, and the stiffening of the tendons prevent the valve from opening thereby disrupting blood flow through the valve opening.

Meaning

Only 5% of cases of tricuspid stenosis have clear clinical signs; however, tricuspid stenosis is always an abnormality and requires further screening.