Diastolic murmur - valve opening clack

2021-03-15 12:00 AM

The distance from A2 to the clack of the valve opening is in part opposite to the degree of the pressure difference between the atria and ventricles during diastole. In other words, the shorter the distance from A2 to the clack of the valve opening, the greater the differential pressure, and the heavier the degree of stenosis.

Description

Short, sharp, high-frequency sounds are heard at the beginning of the diastolic period.

Reason

Mitral valve stenosis.

Mechanism

The mechanism so far is not clear.

It is thought to be caused by a sudden stop during the migration of the mitral dome into the left ventricle, combining a sudden increase in blood flow from the atria to the left ventricle.

To put it simply, the calcified valve narrows to form a 'dome' during diastole, just as the ventricles begin to draw blood into it. Although the leaf is still moving initially, calcification of the leaf will abruptly stop the valve's movement, causing a clack to open the valve.

Meaning

There is still quite a bit of evidence on the validity of this token. However, there are many other features that will aid in determining the degree of stenosis:

The distance from A2 to the clack of the valve opening is in part opposite to the degree of the pressure difference between the atria and ventricles during diastole. In other words, the shorter the distance from A2 to the clack of the valve opening, the greater the differential pressure, and the heavier the degree of stenosis.

The louder T1 or the louder the clack opens, the less calcified the mitral valve is.

Very severe mitral stenosis may not be correlated with a valve opening clack - The valve may be too stiff to open quickly for a valve opening clack.