Papillary oedema - signs of symptoms and causes

2021-03-16 12:00 AM

Papillary oedema occurs by increased intracranial pressure or by compression of the optic nerve. Papillary oedema is a sign of swelling of the optic nerve caused by compression of the optic nerve or increased intracranial pressure.

Description

Papillary oedema is swelling and fading of the edge of the disc.

Causes

Common

Inflammation of vision.

Increased intracranial pressure (eg. Idiopathic increase in intracranial pressure).

Medicines (eg. Ethambutol, chloramphenicol).

Less common

Mass damage (eg. Tumor, abscess, cerebrovascular malformation (AVM)).

Hydrocephalus.

Figure. Concessional oedema in an early stage

Figure. Chronic popular oedema with optic disc hyperplasia and nocturnal hyperplasia

Mechanism

Papillary oedema occurs by increased intracranial pressure or by compression of the optic nerve. Disc oedema is a result of the cytoplasmic flow being blocked in the neurons of optic nerve cells, causing the axon of the II cord to swell. Papillary oedema has been associated with symptoms of other optic nerve dysfunction (eg, decreased vision, affective pupil reflex damage [RAPD], loss of vision). The most common visual defects in acute popular oedema are hypertrophy of the physiological blind spot, tubular vision and loss of the sub-nasal market.

Meaning

Papillary oedema is a sign of swelling of the optic nerve (II wire) by compression of the optic nerve or increased intracranial pressure.